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1980 R200 Transom core demolition


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I was able to move the boat inside my 2 car garage and started removing the transom cap and discovered some sketchy work had been done previously and there was a crack in the core.  It looks like the transom is going to have to be Repaired and Upgraded. The plywood was soaked, black and stinky. At this point, the inner skin of the transom was cut away and part of the motor well was cut away  and a small amount foam was removed down to the lump where the garboard drain is. The closed cell foam was wet but was still light and not waterlogged at all. 

Where is the best place to make a cut to access the sides of the transom??? I plan on removing the rub rail and teak side boards. I was thinking of cutting it where the red dotted line is in the second photo unless someone has a better idea? Or should I do away with the battery boxes, relocate the batteries and the vro to the fore part of the console and enjoy the extra deck space?

The motor rebuild is in the works also. 

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Honestly, the easiest way to do it is cut the transom skin from the outside, leaving about a 4-6" strip all the way around the edge to fair the patch back into once completed.  This will allow you to access all areas of the transom core and remove all that wood.  I can understand trying to do it from the inside from a cosmetic point of view, but unless you are ripping out the entire back of the boat like I did when I enclosed the transom, I don't think you can do as good a job on the core.

Btw...I talked to John Tiger a couple weeks ago.  I thought his name sounded familiar....he remembered me from when we raced tunnel boats back in the '90s.  Heck of a nice guy and sounds like what he does for re-powering is a great idea.  He found a small market segment and seems to be doing real well getting boaters on the water at a decent price.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Here's a pic of the transom after hogging out the damp plywood. I'm thinking about going a little higher on the corners  so that the stern eyes are incorporated  into the new coosa transom. I've back ordered the coosa from Eastern Burlap in Norfolk VA . The splash well will also need to be redone and raised up a tiny bit.

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Did you go with 3/4" or 1 1/2" material?

Definitely replace the wood where the u-bolts are located.  It may be easier to just cut that part of the fiberglass skin off and clear out the rest of the old core.  Save the skin as it can be re- used when putting it all back together.

What is your plan on re-working the splash well?  Are you trying to minimize the depth of the current one so water does not get in the splashwell while at rest?  Is the backside of the well cut out already?

Is Eastern Burlap having problems getting material?  I have heard of a resin shortage industry wide due to demand for new boats....guess the same applies to the other materials involved in boat repair and new construction.

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The splashwell is going to be raised slightly and I'm going with ball scuppers to keep excess sea water out.  The back of the well where it attaches to the skin of the transom is separated. I had to remove that part of the transom because it was all uneven and bubbly from the previous owner's repair. 

The guy at Eastern Burlap said everyone is delayed getting materials.  I was on the waiting list for 2 weeks.  The "Bluewater 26" coosa comes only in 3/4" and 1" thickness. Was originally going to laminate a 1" and a 3/4" together but it would have been too tight of a fit. The new plan is two 3/4" to make 1 1/2" and fill in the difference with biaxial cloth. The old core was 1 5/8". 

 

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Excellent pattern making skills!

If you are cutting your coosa with a jig saw, get a pack of blades.  That stuff is extremely abrasive and will dull the blades.  Figure at least one blade per pattern cut.  Also try to stay upwind so the dust does not get on bare skin as it will itch like fiberglass dust (been there, done that, and itched like heck from it!). 

Depending on how your fiberglass flange is on the back of the transom, it may be easier to do each layer as 3 pieces.  Stagger where the joints fall so both layers don't fall on top of each other.  Radius the outside edge of the coosa where it meets the front skin so it will pull up tight to the skins.  Just prior to installing, mix up a putty of resin and cabosil fibers and run a bead where the radius edge will land in the transom (do this in the cavity, not the board).  This will insure the edge is bedded down at the joint...make sure you lay enough of a bead so it oozes out when the board is pressed into place.

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  • 4 months later...

So it's time to finish this project up. I visited Islamorada with my stepson in March and caught and released my first hogfish as well as grunts and some smaller panfish. I liked it so much we returned the week before memorial day with youngest daughter and her husband. Again we fished the headboat at Robbie's and caught tons more panfish and a triggerfish and a margate.  In June we fished out of Pirates Cove in Manteo NC on the Country Girl, a 57 ft sportfisher that holds 30 passengers.  We caught 50 lbs of delicious Tilefish and cryovaced and froze them and have gone through most of them for family friday night fish fries.  
In early July, an ad appeared on Craigslist for a 2018 R200 at a reasonable price in Roanoke Rapids NC. It is pretty box-stock/plain jane but only had 55 hours on it and had just had 100 hr service. It was too good to pass up and it came with a trailer. So now the 2018 boat is dry stored indoors and the 1980 R200 sits on the 2018 Coyote trailer. The new 2021 aluminum trailer that I bought back in January was still untitled and I was able to sell it on Facebook marketplace for what I paid for it as the price has gone up over 10 percent and the wait time has increased too.  A guy in Chesapeake is finishing up the transom this weekend and it's going to the outboard man John Tiger next week. I plan on using the 1980 as my "keys boat" and leave the 2018 here in Chesapeake. Here's a photo of the new coosa transom under repair.

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  • 2 weeks later...

It's been finished with paint no gelcoat yet.

Update:  It's taken a little longer than expected to get the Engine. John Tiger's talented wife Laura who does the paint and clear coat work has seriously injured her hand and they are dealing with that as well as a backlog of outboard rebuilds. In the mean time, I'm pumping out all the old gas from the tank and taking off all the teak and stripping varnish off of it. Pictures of the 2018 will be posted shortly on an appropriate thread.

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  • 1 month later...

John does great work.  I hear ya on both the smell and sound of a 2 stroke running.  I am old school and those are something I will never forget!  Let us know how it runs once broke in.

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  • 1 month later...

Looks good!  After following John's break in routine, switch over to either the semi or full synthetic 2 stroke oil.  Cuts way down on smoke and carbon buildup in both the head and ring grooves.  I noticed a big difference when I switched from regular to the Penzoil full synthetic on my 1989 150 Johnson.

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