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Retainer Restoration Project 1978 Robalo CC


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Honestly, don't sweat it.  You did not run into any "oil canning" of the coffin floor when the tank was removed and installed, so the foam was still intact.  Age of the boat, though, it probably has some wet foam in there.  Heck, I found some along the bottom 1 inch of my hull when I tore into it, but decided at that time it was not bad enough to rip it all out as the deck and coffin box were not being re-done at the time.

As long as the boat is running fine and in the expected speed range, that is indicative there is not a lot of water in the foam.  Also, the boat appears to be floating just fine in the slip.  Go have fun with it.  We will work out a fix for the transom at another time.

BTW...you do realize that motor is probably 220 hp!  BRP got all the kinks worked out of the fuel injected 2 stroke and it is a nice motor!  Its just a shame they could not shake the stigma of the older technology 2 strokes.

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  • 4 weeks later...

If that is a 232, the 1980 specs say 24 degree deadrise.  Makes it a great boat for rough water, just a little sensitive to weight shift from one side to the  other when anchored.

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12 hours ago, 2-N-TOW said:

If that is a 232, the 1980 specs say 24 degree deadrise.  Makes it a great boat for rough water, just a little sensitive to weight shift from one side to the  other when anchored.

Would that be true in 1978? I don’t think it’s that much. Boat rides kinda hard in rough water

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I cannot say for sure.  These boats will ride hard in rough water if the bow is a little high.  Drop the bow and let it cut through the wave and ride quality improves a lot.

Get one of the free level apps for your phone and you can find out real easy what the deadrise is.

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Hey Dan? I think we may have talked about this before, but I’m considering installing trim tabs over the winter. I’m also talking to boat guy about strengthening the transom. But trim tabs for a moment first. Here is a pic of my stern. I have 2 transducers, operating 2 separate Lowrance units. Where would I install the trim tabs? And I guess I’d have to reposition the transducers?

what effect will the tabs have on the transducers being able to read bottom depth from the tabs being down?

1E3D3939-B6F0-421F-A578-74B6F4E720AB.jpeg

74A99E20-8662-496C-B29E-B4C148A39CD6.jpeg

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To get the best out of trim tabs, they need to be mounted within 8 inches of the outer edge of the bottom.  I will measure mine tomorrow to let you know how close mine are.  You would need to move the outermost transducer.  Depending on the available width, either the Bennett M80 or M120 would be a good choice.  With this style, you could probably get by with the transducer being within 4 inches of the tab and have no adverse impact due to disturbed water flowing under the transducer.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I was checking out the Bennett M120 tabs. Looks I can get the complete set for under $500.

Question: where the tabs get screwed into the hull, would the screws be going into the hull? How thick  is the hull at the transom? 2-3”? I know the actuator arm screws into the transom. But the screws that hold the tabs, I’d be screwing them into the fiberglass hull, correct?

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Correct, they screw to the transom just above the bottom of the hull so that tab forward edge is 1/4" above the bottom of the hull and out of the water flow.

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47 minutes ago, 2-N-TOW said:

Correct, they screw to the transom just above the bottom of the hull so that tab forward edge is 1/4" above the bottom of the hull and out of the water flow.

Ok, I guess what I’m asking is, the screws would be going into the actual hull, as opposed to the wood transom. Boat guy wants to drill very long holes down int the transom wood and pour epoxy to strengthen the transom. What if the wood at the bottom of transom is wet or rotted Where the screws go in for the tabs. 
I kinda like that carbon core transom pour. But does the wood up along the sides of the transom to the eyelets have to be removed too? He reinforced that section of the transom by glassing the wood onto the back skin of the transom. I’d have to pull out a pic when we were doing this.

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So you can see inside the hole, which was cut out (this is where the cleats were on the inside). See the wood transom core. He glassed the wood to the back of the transom so as to strengthen it. Especially for tubing with the kids or maybe water skiing.

6B08D6A5-2389-433E-8B24-82D772C43940.jpeg

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And so my question is, if I go with the carbon core pour option, just how much of the wood transom has to come out?

 

or is the drill down multiple hole with a long drill bit and pour epoxy the way to go?

how would that effect the trim tab screws at the hull bottom?

I am ignorant to this process.

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All wood needs to be removed from the transom prior to going with Carbon Core.  The tabs would need to be removed prior to removing the wood core as they would extend through the glass skin into the core material.

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47 minutes ago, 2-N-TOW said:

All wood needs to be removed from the transom prior to going with Carbon Core.  The tabs would need to be removed prior to removing the wood core as they would extend through the glass skin into the core material.

That’s what I was wondering....I didn’t know how thick the bottom of the hull was. As to whether the tab screws would be screwed into the wood transom or the  hull itself.

ugh, all this work I did.......

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I would not do it.  Epoxy by itself is really not that strong.  Think of it as a binder; not something that adds strength. 

In order for the epoxy "rods"  to really add anything to the transom, they would have to be drilled with a square hole so the front and back of the hole is in contact with the fiberglass transom skins, creating an I beam type structure.  That way, any attempt of movement against the outer skin would be transmitted to the inner skin.  If the epoxy rod is not touching the 2 skins, it would be like removing the web structure from an I beam and the top and bottom would continue to flex until some piece failed. 

When I say epoxy is not strong by itself, same concept applies to fiberglass.  Ever done any glass work and you have a little resin left in the bottom of the plastic container that kicks off and hardens?  Pop it out the next day, bounce it off the floor and it will crack.  Epoxy will do the same thing.  Now, if you threw some fiberglass fibers in either the resin or epoxy prior to it hardening, pop that out and throw on the ground, it is a lot less prone to crack due to the fibers working together to strengthen the resin/epoxy.  A little over-simplified, but I think you will understand the idea.

As much time and money you have put in to the boat to get it where it is now, the only way to fix it is a transom replacement; otherwise you will be chasing it for a long time.  Even cutting the outside skin off may sound intrusive but putting it back together and finishing it off is not that hard.  Lots of guys on here have done it over the years.  The hardest part is making that first cut in the fiberglass!

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